Consumer and Market Research

View of RKS Consumer and Market Research women looking at table filled with different images

Consumer and Market Research

RKS is a human-centered consumer research, market research, and ethnographic research firm.

RKS logo small
About RKS
Consumer research and market research are the cornerstones of user-centric design. In the user-centric design process, designers focus on the users and their needs in each phase of the design process. In many cases, these needs are defined through ethnographic research (also called ethnographies), a qualitative method where researchers observe and/or interact with a study’s participants in their real-life environment. Conducting ethnographies in real-life environments aims to get ‘under the skin’ of a design problem. By learning about the user’s values, needs, and psychological makeup, researchers can better empathize with their pain points and where best to deliver value. Value is perceived differently across consumers, and ethnographies are key in understanding these differences.
RKS is a comprehensive consumer research, market research, and ethnographic research firm. Our quantitative and qualitative approach to research design and implementation is fueled by how products make customers feel and how those products make them feel about themselves. Whether creating research for new products and services or existing ones, we believe a carefully designed ethnography can be a cornerstone to creating great products. We use our advanced Psycho-Aesthetic process to solve complex problems that address design, engineering, brand, and regulatory issues. Our cross-disciplinary specialists, researchers, designers, and engineers leverage their deep experience within multiple industries and technologies to spark creative and innovative solutions.
Clients that have moved with us

RKS is a human-centered consumer research, market research, and ethnographic research firm.

RKS logo small
Ethnographic Research Services
Design approach of RKS Design consultancy in Los Angeles smaller image

About RKS

Consumer research and market research are the cornerstones of user-centric design. In the user-centric design process, designers focus on the users and their needs in each phase of the design process. In many cases, these needs are defined through ethnographic research (also called ethnographies), a qualitative method where researchers observe and/or interact with a study’s participants in their real-life environment. Conducting ethnographies in real-life environments aims to get ‘under the skin’ of a design problem. By learning about the user’s values, needs, and psychological makeup, researchers can better empathize with their pain points and where best to deliver value. Value is perceived differently across consumers, and ethnographies are key in understanding these differences.
RKS is a comprehensive consumer research, market research, and ethnographic research firm. Our quantitative and qualitative approach to research design and implementation is fueled by how products make customers feel and how those products make them feel about themselves. Whether creating research for new products and services or existing ones, we believe a carefully designed ethnography can be a cornerstone to creating great products. We use our advanced Psycho-Aesthetic process to solve complex problems that address design, engineering, brand, and regulatory issues. Our cross-disciplinary specialists, researchers, designers, and engineers leverage their deep experience within multiple industries and technologies to spark creative and innovative solutions.
Clients that have moved with us

Research Planning

Careful planning of ethnographic research is essential to creating long-lasting products and services. At the same time, a well-designed ethnography can reduce the cost of product development by targeting the vital data required without wasting valuable time and resources. The ethnographic research process has multiple phases, from planning to execution and applications. At the beginning of the study, it’s essential for a researcher to fully 

understand the intent of the study to develop discussion guides, questions, and stimuli to gain insights into the areas important to the clients and other stakeholders. Once the locations for the study have been identified, the researcher can determine the best presentation or collection method. Finally, the researcher can acquire the necessary permissions from our subjects and access to the locations we need to be in.
View of RKS Consumer and Market Research team working on wall of sticky notes and P/A proccesses

Research Question

The initial part of our ethnographies begins with a question – what problem are we seeking to understand better? Developing a problem statement allows us to raise questions about the problem we seek to gain more information about. This problem may be about nearly any topic that addresses people in a designated environment. For example, we may be trying to better understand their culture, relationships, interactions, processes, or anything else that affects how people think and/or behave. A research problem usually implies a person or group of people to study, making it easier to identify suitable subjects from the beginning. Identifying an apparent problem makes the rest of the ethnography process efficient. Without an apparent problem or question, the process risks go too shallow or too deep into the right problem.

Location

After identifying the research problem, it’s crucial to identify the best place to conduct the research process. The guiding principle for location selection is to provide the best opportunity to observe, participate, take field notes, and make sense of how the people in that environment act, communicate and think. Locations can be local or global. In some cases, we may choose more than one location if the question/problem warrants it. While we don’t need to travel to the locations, our presence, whether real or virtual, must allow us to connect with the subjects. We have access to AR, VR, and other technologies to create the virtual presence we need.

Interview Methods

The interview method is a key consideration for ethnographic research. The method will consider the participants, locations, and problem being considered. Ultimately, we consider the most effective way(s) to obtain objective information. In cases where we need to adopt a role of a person in the community or organization we need to be present. On the other hand, where the problem requires us to be covert we may need to be creative in covering our presence. In both cases, there are instances where we can find ways to be present or remote, depending on the needs. Ultimately, we know that in many cases if others know we are a research team, they will act and respond differently. Our experience helps us overcome those issues.

Consent

One of the biggest challenges of ethnographic research is gaining the informed consent of the participants. Obtaining this consent requires empathy and communication skills, which in turn require deep experience in doing this type of research. Consent is required for many parts of the research. For example, it is usually necessary to obtain permission for access into the location. This consent might be from the owner of the location, the manager of the location, or staff of the location. In addition to consent, it’s important to explain to the decision-makers what our interview methods will be. This includes what observational methods we’ll use, how we plan to participate, and how the information we collect will be used. Being ethical and considerate at this point is critically important.
Beat the Streets branding used on folio
Research Planning
Careful planning of ethnographic research is essential to creating long-lasting products and services. At the same time, a well-designed ethnography can reduce the cost of product development by targeting the vital data required without wasting valuable time and resources. The ethnographic research process has multiple phases, from planning to execution and applications. At the beginning of the study, it’s essential for a researcher to fully understand the intent of the study to develop discussion guides, questions, and stimuli to gain insights into the areas important to the clients and other stakeholders. Once the locations for the study have been identified, the researcher can determine the best presentation or collection method. Finally, the researcher can acquire the necessary permissions from our subjects and access to the locations we need to be in.
View of RKS Consumer and Market Research team working on wall of sticky notes and P/A proccesses
Research Question
The initial part of our ethnographies begins with a question – what problem are we seeking to understand better? Developing a problem statement allows us to raise questions about the problem we seek to gain more information about. This problem may be about nearly any topic that addresses people in a designated environment. For example, we may be trying to better understand their culture, relationships, interactions, processes, or anything else that affects how people think and/or behave. A research problem usually implies a person or group of people to study, making it easier to identify suitable subjects from the beginning. Identifying an apparent problem makes the rest of the ethnography process efficient. Without an apparent problem or question, the process risks go too shallow or too deep into the right problem.
Location
After identifying the research problem, it’s crucial to identify the best place to conduct the research process. The guiding principle for location selection is to provide the best opportunity to observe, participate, take field notes, and make sense of how the people in that environment act, communicate and think. Locations can be local or global. In some cases, we may choose more than one location if the question/problem warrants it. While we don’t need to travel to the locations, our presence, whether real or virtual, must allow us to connect with the subjects. We have access to AR, VR, and other technologies to create the virtual presence we need.
Beat the Streets branding used on folio
Interview Methods
The interview method is a key consideration for ethnographic research. The method will consider the participants, locations, and problem being considered. Ultimately, we consider the most effective way(s) to obtain objective information. In cases where we need to adopt a role of a person in the community or organization we need to be present. On the other hand, where the problem requires us to be covert we may need to be creative in covering our presence. In both cases, there are instances where we can find ways to be present or remote, depending on the needs. Ultimately, we know that in many cases if others know we are a research team, they will act and respond differently. Our experience helps us overcome those issues.
Consent
One of the biggest challenges of ethnographic research is gaining the informed consent of the participants. Obtaining this consent requires empathy and communication skills, which in turn require deep experience in doing this type of research. Consent is required for many parts of the research. For example, it is usually necessary to obtain permission for access into the location. This consent might be from the owner of the location, the manager of the location, or staff of the location. In addition to consent, it’s important to explain to the decision-makers what our interview methods will be. This includes what observational methods we’ll use, how we plan to participate, and how the information we collect will be used. Being ethical and considerate at this point is critically important.
Research Management
Once the planning is done, we begin the process of conducting research. The process of conducting ethnographic research varies depending on the project. However, there are relationships between the type of product or service we’re researching for and the process we use. For a consumer product, for example, we’re likely to focus on participants in their homes, vehicles, or other locations that would normally use a consumer product. For an industrial product, on the other hand, we would likely visit participants at their place of work, during work hours or a shift. In the case of brand strategy, we may do both. In all cases, we’re making decisions based on the type of information we want to gather from the type of participants we need to get it from, in the place that’s most natural. We have years of experience selecting the right process for the right type of work.
View of RKS Consumer and Market research team conducting research of ergnomics for syringe device
Observation and Participation
Ethnographic research is a combination of observation and participation. Effective research requires observing the subjects in their environment, and participating in the organization we are researching in some capacity. Collecting notes during this observation and participation is an important way to derive values from the experience. We use the problem statement and questions developed earlier to help direct our engagement, and the most effective ways to collect notes. We try and be as objective as possible when observing and participating. To do that, we try to document during the research rather than afterward, immediately writing down descriptions, things we remember, impressions and feelings, and ideas that come to mind.
Interview Process
When most people think of ethnography and ethnographic research they immediately think of interviews. Interviews are indeed a large part of many of our ethnography projects. Interviews allow us to increase our visibility into behaviors and actions. In some cases we conduct interviews immediately after an observation or participating in an activity. In other cases we will conduct an interview at the end of a designated observation period, at the end of the day, or even at the end of the entire research period. In all cases we determine who is best to interview and what questions are critical to helping us understand your research question.
Data and Synthesis
In addition to creating our own data, an important part of ethnographic research is using data that has already been created. Organizations usually have collections of papers, emails, physical artifacts, phone conversations, marketing collateral, websites, and other information-rich sources that enhance our understanding. A researcher who studies the anthropological and social habits of participants through these other types of data can generally fill in gaps in their knowledge. In addition, this type of data allows a research to contextualize the primary research, as well as help us navigate some of the complexities of specific organizations or industries. In this way, the method of ethnography can be enhanced by the study of secondary research.
Markets and Industries
Understanding human behavior is key to our user-centric design focus. Human behavior is drive by deep psychological needs. However it’s usually impossible to simply ask people to describe these needs. We have alarming blind spots when it comes to describing our own behavior. In trying to recall what we did or believe we did, our recollections will often not align with what actually happened. We falter especially when trying to define why we did something. When we try to describe the motivations behind our actions, we’re often unable to name the things that compelled us. The needs or desires that urged us toward an action simply might not be clear to us. As a result, ethnography is incredibly important to the work we do.
Child Safety Network branding and strategy on different goods
UX
As a methodology for UX design, ethnographic research is both about how people interact with technology, and also about how they describe their experience of interacting with their technology. Ethnography as applied to UX design has been referred to as digital anthropology. It observes people in their natural environments in order to understand their needs. Using data gathered from this use helps us design UX that is proven to work. For example, if we’re designing an industrial product that’s used in high-stress environments, it’s important that our UX reduces or eliminates this stress. We can use ethnography to understand the key stressors in the environments and design around them.
Brand
Ultimately, brands informed by ethnographic research are more durable, better targeted, and more financially successful. A strong, lovable brand can be a major asset that can ensure continuous growth, encourage user consistency, increase demand, and create a competitive advantage. This competitive advantage is created through an emotional connection derived from a deep understanding of the needs and wants of customers. Our ethnography research is used to generate qualitative and quantitative insights into consumers, their needs, their aspirations, their challenges, how they work, how they live, how they play, and the interior and social architecture of their lives. We use this picture as the basis of our designs.
RKS Product Design and Development company employees looking at posters in conference room
Product Design
Determining a design for a consumer device requires a holistic approach. We consider everything from our client’s priorities, to financial investment, to regulatory requirements, to market identification. In other words, we are not just looking at the product, but the entire context of the product in the user’s life. Ethnography is used as a key data for this holistic approach.

Research Management

Once the planning is done, we begin the process of conducting research. The process of conducting ethnographic research varies depending on the project. However, there are relationships between the type of product or service we’re researching for and the process we use. For a consumer product, for example, we’re likely to focus on participants in their homes, vehicles, or other locations that would normally use a consumer product. For an 

industrial product, on the other hand, we would likely visit participants at their place of work, during work hours or a shift. In the case of brand strategy, we may do both. In all cases, we’re making decisions based on the type of information we want to gather from the type of participants we need to get it from, in the place that’s most natural. We have years of experience selecting the right process for the right type of work.
View of RKS Consumer and Market research team conducting research of ergnomics for syringe device

Observation and Participation

Ethnographic research is a combination of observation and participation. Effective research requires observing the subjects in their environment, and participating in the organization we are researching in some capacity. Collecting notes during this observation and participation is an important way to derive values from the experience. We use the problem statement and questions developed earlier to help direct our engagement, and the most effective ways to collect notes. We try and be as objective as possible when observing and participating. To do that, we try to document during the research rather than afterward, immediately writing down descriptions, things we remember, impressions and feelings, and ideas that come to mind.

Interview Process

When most people think of ethnography and ethnographic research they immediately think of interviews. Interviews are indeed a large part of many of our ethnography projects. Interviews allow us to increase our visibility into behaviors and actions. In some cases we conduct interviews immediately after an observation or participating in an activity. In other cases we will conduct an interview at the end of a designated observation period, at the end of the day, or even at the end of the entire research period. In all cases we determine who is best to interview and what questions are critical to helping us understand your research question.

Data and Synthesis

In addition to creating our own data, an important part of ethnographic research is using data that has already been created. Organizations usually have collections of papers, emails, physical artifacts, phone conversations, marketing collateral, websites, and other information-rich sources that enhance our understanding. A researcher who studies the anthropological and social habits of participants through these other types of data can generally fill in gaps in their knowledge. In addition, this type of data allows a research to contextualize the primary research, as well as help us navigate some of the complexities of specific organizations or industries. In this way, the method of ethnography can be enhanced by the study of secondary research.

Markets and Industries

Understanding human behavior is key to our user-centric design focus. Human behavior is drive by deep psychological needs. However it’s usually impossible to simply ask people to describe these needs. We have alarming blind spots when it comes to describing our own behavior. In trying to recall what we did or believe we did, our recollections will often not align with what 

actually happened. We falter especially when trying to define why we did something. When we try to describe the motivations behind our actions, we’re often unable to name the things that compelled us. The needs or desires that urged us toward an action simply might not be clear to us. As a result, ethnography is incredibly important to the work we do.
Child Safety Network branding and strategy on different goods

UX

As a methodology for UX design, ethnographic research is both about how people interact with technology, and also about how they describe their experience of interacting with their technology. Ethnography as applied to UX design has been referred to as digital anthropology. It observes people in their natural environments in order to understand their needs. Using data gathered from this use helps us design UX that is proven to work. For example, if we’re designing an industrial product that’s used in high-stress environments, it’s important that our UX reduces or eliminates this stress. We can use ethnography to understand the key stressors in the environments and design around them.

Brand

Ultimately, brands informed by ethnographic research are more durable, better targeted, and more financially successful. A strong, lovable brand can be a major asset that can ensure continuous growth, encourage user consistency, increase demand, and create a competitive advantage. This competitive advantage is created through an emotional connection derived from a deep understanding of the needs and wants of customers. Our ethnography research is used to generate qualitative and quantitative insights into consumers, their needs, their aspirations, their challenges, how they work, how they live, how they play, and the interior and social architecture of their lives. We use this picture as the basis of our designs.

Product Design

Determining a design for a consumer device requires a holistic approach. We consider everything from our client’s priorities, to financial investment, to regulatory requirements, to market identification. In other words, we are not just looking at the product, but the entire context of the product in the user’s life. Ethnography is used as a key data for this holistic approach.
RKS Product Design and Development company employees looking at posters in conference room
FAQ's

A market research firm provides the foundational insights for product and service strategy and new product development. Market research synthesizes the current and future needs of a market in a way that creates actionable insights for decision makers. A market research firm creates the market research plan, identifies the methods of research, and executes on the market research plan.

A market research firm is a company that provides businesses and organizations with valuable insights and information about their target markets. This information is used to help organizations make informed decisions about their marketing and business strategies.

Market research firms conduct a variety of different types of research in order to gather this information. Some common methods include surveys, focus groups, interviews, and experiments. These research methods allow the firm to collect data from a variety of sources, including customers, competitors, and industry experts.

Market research often includes primary and secondary research, interviews, ethnographies, and competitive intelligence. Because we use Psycho-Aesthetics, our human-centered methodology we also use tools such as the P/A™Map

Once the data is collected, a market research firm will analyze it in order to identify trends and patterns. This analysis allows the firm to provide its clients with valuable insights about their target markets, such as consumer behavior, market trends, and customer preferences.
In addition to providing market research services, many firms also offer consulting services. These services can include helping businesses and organizations develop marketing plans, evaluate new products and services, and identify potential areas for growth and expansion.

Overall, the role of a market research firm is to help businesses and organizations make informed decisions about their target markets. By providing valuable insights and information, these firms help their clients to better understand their customers, competitors, and industry trends. This enables businesses to make more effective marketing and business decisions, which can ultimately lead to increased revenue and success.

RKS is a full-service market research firm. We create market research plans, conduct ethnographic research, and benchmark analogous and competitive offerings.

RKS utilizes a holistic set of design research methods that are tailored to each project. Based on our human-centered design methodology, Psycho-Aesthetics we utilize methods that help us understand and synthesize the core needs and wants of consumers that pertain to the project.

Ethnography involves conducting in-depth, observational research in a natural setting. This means that the researcher immerses themselves in the community they are studying and observes the interactions, practices, and behavior of the people within that community. The researcher is not simply an outsider looking in, but rather becomes a part of the community and participates in the daily activities and routines of the people they are studying.

Ethnography is a holistic approach to research, meaning that it takes into account the entire context and culture of the community being studied. It looks at the various social and cultural factors that influence the behavior and practices of the people within that community. This includes factors such as language, religion, customs, traditions, and social norms.

One of the key strengths of ethnography is that it allows the researcher to gain a deep and nuanced understanding of the culture and community being studied. By living among the people and participating in their daily activities, the researcher is able to gain a rich and detailed understanding of their culture and practices. This level of immersion allows the researcher to capture the nuances and complexities of the culture that may be missed by more traditional research methods.

Ethnography is also a flexible and adaptable research method. As the researcher becomes a part of the community, they are able to adapt and modify their research approach based on the needs and interests of the community. This means that the research can evolve and change as the community changes, allowing for a more dynamic and responsive research process.
Ethnography is not without its limitations, however. One challenge is that the researcher may become too embedded in the community and lose objectivity. It is important for the researcher to maintain a critical and reflective approach to their research, and to be aware of their own biases and assumptions.

Another challenge is that ethnography can be time-consuming and resource-intensive. Because it involves in-depth, observational research, it can take longer to conduct than other research methods. Additionally, the researcher must invest a significant amount of time and effort into building trust and relationships within the community, which can be challenging.

Despite these challenges, ethnography remains an important and valuable method of qualitative research. It allows researchers to gain a deep and nuanced understanding of the cultures and communities they study, and to uncover the complex social and cultural factors that influence their behavior and practices.

UX design research is the process of gathering and analyzing data about how users interact with a product or service in order to improve the overall user experience. This can include conducting user interviews, focus groups, usability testing, and other forms of user research to gather data on user behavior, needs, and preferences.

The goal of UX design research is to gain insight into the user’s perspective, and to use this information to inform the design and development of a product or service. This process allows UX designers to identify pain points and areas for improvement, and to make informed decisions about how to best meet the needs of users.

UX design research is a crucial part of the design process, as it helps to ensure that the end product is user-friendly and meets the needs of the target audience. By conducting research, UX designers can identify user behaviors and patterns, and use this information to inform their design decisions. This can include things like understanding how users navigate through a website, or identifying common challenges that users face when using a particular app.
Additionally, UX design research can help UX designers to gain a deeper understanding of user motivations and preferences. This can include things like understanding why users might choose one product over another, or what features are most important to users when making a purchase decision. By understanding these factors, UX designers can create designs that are more effective at meeting user needs and preferences.

Overall, UX design research is a crucial part of the design process, as it helps UX designers to create products and services that are user-friendly, effective, and engaging. By conducting research and gathering data on user behavior and preferences, UX designers can create designs that are tailored to the needs and preferences of their target audience, resulting in a better overall user experience.

Consumer & Market Research Case Study Spotlight​
Intel
Creating a new business unit to position Intel into a service provider and not just a chip manufacturer.
FreshRealm

A zero waste solution that provides healthy meals right to your doorstep.

FloWater
A more premium, refreshing, and sustainable alternative to disposable water bottles.

Experience more of our Consumer and Market Research Work​.

FAQ's

A market research firm provides the foundational insights for product and service strategy and new product development. Market research synthesizes the current and future needs of a market in a way that creates actionable insights for decision makers. A market research firm creates the market research plan, identifies the methods of research, and executes on the market research plan.

A market research firm is a company that provides businesses and organizations with valuable insights and information about their target markets. This information is used to help organizations make informed decisions about their marketing and business strategies.

Market research firms conduct a variety of different types of research in order to gather this information. Some common methods include surveys, focus groups, interviews, and experiments. These research methods allow the firm to collect data from a variety of sources, including customers, competitors, and industry experts.

Market research often includes primary and secondary research, interviews, ethnographies, and competitive intelligence. Because we use Psycho-Aesthetics, our human-centered methodology we also use tools such as the P/A™Map

Once the data is collected, a market research firm will analyze it in order to identify trends and patterns. This analysis allows the firm to provide its clients with valuable insights about their target markets, such as consumer behavior, market trends, and customer preferences.
In addition to providing market research services, many firms also offer consulting services. These services can include helping businesses and organizations develop marketing plans, evaluate new products and services, and identify potential areas for growth and expansion.

Overall, the role of a market research firm is to help businesses and organizations make informed decisions about their target markets. By providing valuable insights and information, these firms help their clients to better understand their customers, competitors, and industry trends. This enables businesses to make more effective marketing and business decisions, which can ultimately lead to increased revenue and success.

RKS is a full-service market research firm. We create market research plans, conduct ethnographic research, and benchmark analogous and competitive offerings.

RKS utilizes a holistic set of design research methods that are tailored to each project. Based on our human-centered design methodology, Psycho-Aesthetics we utilize methods that help us understand and synthesize the core needs and wants of consumers that pertain to the project.

Ethnography is a method of qualitative research that focuses on the study of cultures, groups, and communities. It is a way of investigating and understanding the social and cultural practices of a particular group or community.

Ethnography involves conducting in-depth, observational research in a natural setting. This means that the researcher immerses themselves in the community they are studying and observes the interactions, practices, and behavior of the people within that community. The researcher is not simply an outsider looking in, but rather becomes a part of the community and participates in the daily activities and routines of the people they are studying.

Ethnography is a holistic approach to research, meaning that it takes into account the entire context and culture of the community being studied. It looks at the various social and cultural factors that influence the behavior and practices of the people within that community. This includes factors such as language, religion, customs, traditions, and social norms.

One of the key strengths of ethnography is that it allows the researcher to gain a deep and nuanced understanding of the culture and community being studied. By living among the people and participating in their daily activities, the researcher is able to gain a rich and detailed understanding of their culture and practices. This level of immersion allows the researcher to capture the nuances and complexities of the culture that may be missed by more traditional research methods.

Ethnography is also a flexible and adaptable research method. As the researcher becomes a part of the community, they are able to adapt and modify their research approach based on the needs and interests of the community. This means that the research can evolve and change as the community changes, allowing for a more dynamic and responsive research process.
Ethnography is not without its limitations, however. One challenge is that the researcher may become too embedded in the community and lose objectivity. It is important for the researcher to maintain a critical and reflective approach to their research, and to be aware of their own biases and assumptions.

Another challenge is that ethnography can be time-consuming and resource-intensive. Because it involves in-depth, observational research, it can take longer to conduct than other research methods. Additionally, the researcher must invest a significant amount of time and effort into building trust and relationships within the community, which can be challenging.

Despite these challenges, ethnography remains an important and valuable method of qualitative research. It allows researchers to gain a deep and nuanced understanding of the cultures and communities they study, and to uncover the complex social and cultural factors that influence their behavior and practices.

 

UX design research is the process of gathering and analyzing data about how users interact with a product or service in order to improve the overall user experience. This can include conducting user interviews, focus groups, usability testing, and other forms of user research to gather data on user behavior, needs, and preferences.

The goal of UX design research is to gain insight into the user’s perspective, and to use this information to inform the design and development of a product or service. This process allows UX designers to identify pain points and areas for improvement, and to make informed decisions about how to best meet the needs of users.

UX design research is a crucial part of the design process, as it helps to ensure that the end product is user-friendly and meets the needs of the target audience. By conducting research, UX designers can identify user behaviors and patterns, and use this information to inform their design decisions. This can include things like understanding how users navigate through a website, or identifying common challenges that users face when using a particular app.
Additionally, UX design research can help UX designers to gain a deeper understanding of user motivations and preferences. This can include things like understanding why users might choose one product over another, or what features are most important to users when making a purchase decision. By understanding these factors, UX designers can create designs that are more effective at meeting user needs and preferences.

Overall, UX design research is a crucial part of the design process, as it helps UX designers to create products and services that are user-friendly, effective, and engaging. By conducting research and gathering data on user behavior and preferences, UX designers can create designs that are tailored to the needs and preferences of their target audience, resulting in a better overall user experience.

Consumer & Market Research Case Study Spotlight​
Intel

Creating a new business unit to position Intel into a service provider and not just a chip manufacturer.

FloWater

A more premium, refreshing, and sustainable alternative to disposable water bottles.

FreshRealm

A zero waste solution that provides healthy meals right to your dooorstep.

Experience more of our Consumer and Market Research Work​.